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You frequently use analogies. Whereas according to logic, an analogy does not offer certainty, and the issues which require conviction to be believed in need to be based on logical proofs. Analogy is used by the scholars of jurisprudence for the propositions for the solution of which a fairly certain presumption is enough. Furthermore, you set forth the analogies and comparisons in the form of parables. Whereas parables are imaginary-not real.

Although according to logic analogies do not offer certainty, among the sorts of analogies there is one that it is stronger than logical proofs and gives greater certainty than deductions. It is as follows.

Through a particular analogy you point to the tip of a universal truth and base your conclusion on that truth. In order to teach that mighty truth and deal with particular incidents and realities in accordance with it, you show the general or universal law on which the truth is based in a certain, particular object.

For example, through the analogy that even though the sun is a single body, it is, by virtue of being a light-emitting body, present in all shining objects at the same time, we are showing the law of a truth that there are no restrictions to light and things of light. Whether long or short, distances are the same for them; whether small or great, amounts make no difference for them, and they cannot be contained in space.

Again, for example, the leaves and fruits of a tree are formed easily and perfectly at the same time in the same center through a law of Divine Command. This shows the tip of a mighty truth and a universal law and proves that truth and law decisively. Like a tree, this vast universe is also the result of that law and the manifestation of oneness.

All the analogies and comparisons in The Words are of this kind. They offer greater conviction and certainty than logical proofs.

As for the second part of the question, as you know, according to the science of eloquence, if a word or phrase is used to suggest or express a meaning other than its original one, it is called a metaphor. In such statements, not the original, but the metaphorical meaning is considered. If the metaphorical meaning conforms to the reality, you are saying the truth; otherwise not.

For example, in order to express that somebody is tall, people say: ‘The sheath of so-and-so’s sword is long’. If that man is tall, this statement is true, even if he does not have a sword. If the man is not tall, you are telling a lie even if he has a sword with a long sheath, because the saying is only figurative in meaning.


Recommended Reading
The Quranic expressions like ‘the Best of the Creators’, ‘the Most Merciful of the Merciful’ suggest the existence of other creators and merciful ones.

Last Updated on July 27, 2000

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